Can Dogs Eat Ginger?

Can Dogs Eat Ginger

According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, ginger has been mentioned in ancient Sanskrit, Chinese, Greek, Roman, and Arabic texts for health-related purposes. It has been used for thousands of years, particularly in Asian medicine, to treat stomach aches, diarrhea, and nausea.

Ginger is safe for dogs to eat in small quantities and can provide several health benefits. Fresh ginger root is packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties that promote healthy blood circulation, ease bloating and increase heart health. However, it is crucial to note that what we describe here is fresh ginger and not ginger flavoring. 

Baked or simulated ginger is not strong enough, and thus, it doesn’t give any nutritional advantages. Besides, ginger in combination with other spices or ingredients can harm your dog. Furthermore, it can increase serotonin levels to calm your pup and boost their mood. Also, by helping soothe pain and discomfort in your dog’s body, they will no longer have to stress about their body hurting.

Bottom line: Yes, Dogs can eat ginger. However, before incorporating any form of ginger into your adult dog’s diet, consult a veterinary professional. Always regulate the amount of ginger you feed to your dog. Small dogs below ten pounds can eat up to one-quarter teaspoon of fresh ginger a day. Canines between ten and thirty-five pounds can consume one-half teaspoon of fresh ginger a day, and giant breeds can eat three-quarters of a teaspoon.

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Can Dogs Drink Ginger Tea Safely?

Yes, dogs can drink Ginger tea safely. Grate between half a teaspoon to a teaspoon of fresh ginger into one cup of hot water. Allow the ginger to seep into the water until it becomes cool. Completely drain out the grated ginger, so only the cool tea is left. The table below shows how much your Senior Basset with painful joints can drink, and your poodle prone to car sickness can have a few sips of ginger tea before your next road trip.

Dog’s Weight

Dosage

X Per Day

1 to 10 pounds 

Less than ¼ cup

1 to 3 times per day

10 to 20 pounds

¼ cup

1 to 3 times per day

20 to 50 pounds

¼ to ½ cup

1 to 3 times per day

50 to 100 pounds

½ to 1 cup

1 to 3 times per day

Over 100 pounds

Up to 1 cup

1 to 3 times per day

Can Dogs Eat Candied Ginger Safely?

Candied anything is bad for dogs. Dogs should NOT have sugar added to anything. The damage it could cause is listed below.

  • Sugar causes dental damage
  • Sugar can be toxic to dogs
  • Sugar can cause weight gain and obesity
  • Obesity is the leading cause of diabetes

Can Dogs Eat Gingerbread Safely?

The short answer is yes. Giving your pet a small piece of a gingerbread cookie may not cause any problems, but they can make your Dachshund and even your Rottweiler sick in large amounts. Below are the typical gingerbread cookie ingredients; let’s explore them.

  • Butter – not toxic, but too much can cause gastrointestinal upset and even lead to pancreatitis
  • Flour – not toxic but white flour is not as healthy as whole wheat flour
  • Baking soda – only toxic if large amounts are consumed
  • Brown or white sugar – not toxic, but frequent sugary snacks can cause weight gain and even lead to diabetes
  • Molasses – high in sugar, posing the same risks as sugar
  • Egg – if your pet eats the raw batter, there is a risk of Salmonella poisoning
  • Pure or artificial vanilla extract – 35% alcohol content, which is toxic to dogs, but you can purchase alcohol-free vanilla extract from many health food stores
  • Spices – none of these are toxic in small amounts, but large amounts or concentrated oils can be toxic.
    • Ground ginger – large amounts can cause gastrointestinal upset and lethargy
    • Cinnamon – large amounts can cause vomiting, diarrhea, irritation of the mouth and lungs (inhaling accidentally when consuming), low blood sugar, heart arrhythmias
    • Allspice – contains the compound eugenol which can cause liver toxicity in cats
    • Cloves – contain eugenol posing liver toxicity dangers
    • Nutmeg (not typically in gingerbread cookies but everyone’s recipes are different) – a toxin called myristicin in large amounts can cause hallucinations, disorientation, tachycardia (increased heart rate), hypertension (high blood pressure), dry mouth, abdominal pain, seizures
  • Salt – too much salt can cause increased thirst, an excessive amount can cause salt toxicity
  • Icing/Royal Icing – sugar, can cause weight gain and even lead to diabetes
    • Meringue powder (contains eggs) or raw egg whites
    • Confectioners’ sugar
    • Water

Although these ingredients can only be harmful in large amounts, your sweet tooth furry friend might work out how to get to the bowl of gingerbread cookies on the kitchen counter. And if you can’t resist your canine companion’s begging eyes, you might share too many cookies without realizing the risks.

Can Dogs Eat Grated Ginger Safely?

Yes, dogs can eat grated ginger in limited quantities, and too much could have the opposite effect than what you want to achieve.

Can Dogs Eat Raw Ginger Safely?

Yes, dogs of all breeds can eat limited quantities of raw ginger, from the small furry Havanese to canine companions the size of a St. Bernard. Raw ginger can be a great natural supplement to help certain ailments. Still, you need to ensure that if your dog is on any medication, you check with your vet before giving ginger. 

Raw ginger has some powerful and amazing natural components, so you don’t want it to interfere with your dog’s medication. Or work with your holistic vet to incorporate ginger into your furry friend’s diet.

If your pet is fit and healthy, ginger can be an excellent medicinal herb to add to your dog’s diet. Just ensure your ginger is from a good source, and don’t go overboard in giving this to your canine buddy.

How to prepare Ginger for dogs?

There are tons of ways you can give your dog ginger, and it mostly comes down to trial-and-error regarding taste and what your pup likes. While your gentle Tibetan Mastiff giant loves the taste of ginger, your picky little Pekingnese might turn away from the aroma of ginger.

You can add fresh ginger to your dog’s food, and many will eat it if it is finely chopped or grated and mixed into the food. You could also bake ginger into dog treats, blend it in a dog-appropriate smoothie, and even freeze the smoothie into small frozen cubes for a treat.

Suppose you have a Pug, an English Bulldog, or another brachycephalic or flat-faced dog breed. In that case, you may want to take the hydrating route as another option. You could make ginger water or ginger-infused tea to let your heat-sensitive dog benefit from the hydrating qualities of ginger.

Always consult with a veterinarian before incorporating even small doses of ginger into your dog’s diet. Be mindful that your dog’s size will dictate how much ginger they can eat. Regardless of the option, following the guides below is crucial.

Fresh Ginger

Cut the ginger root’s skin off with a knife and finely mince or grate the yellow part of the root.

Dog’s Weight

Dosage

X Per Day

1 to 10 pounds 

¼ Teaspoon

1 to 3 times per day

10 to 35 pounds

½ Teaspoon

1 to 3 times per day

35 pounds and more

¼ to ½ cup

1 to 3 times per day

Additionally, there are plenty of ginger treats and ginger supplements available for dogs that provide the benefits of ginger without the mess or hassle of keeping it fresh. Along with fresh ginger, it is available in different forms, including powdered ginger, ginger capsules, and ginger tincture (liquid). The different forms of ginger and the amounts to use are listed below.

NOTE: Never give your dog ginger in any form without discussing it with your vet.

Powdered Ginger (note that this pure ground ginger and not a commercial ginger spice blend.)

Dog’s Weight

Dosage

X Per Day

1 to 10 pounds 

Up to Teaspoon

1 to 3 times per day

10 to 20 pounds

to ¼ Teaspoon

1 to 3 times per day

20 to 50 pounds

½ Teaspoon

1 to 3 times per day

50 to 100 pounds

1 Teaspoon

1 to 3 times per day

Over 100 pounds

2 Teaspoons

1 to 3 times per day

Ginger Capsules

Dog’s Weight

Dosage

X Per Day

1 to 10 pounds 

½ Capsule

1 to 3 times per day

10 to 20 pounds

½ to 1 Capsule

1 to 3 times per day

20 to 50 pounds

1 to 2 Capsules

2 to 3 times per day

50 to 100 pounds

1 to 2 Capsules

3 to 4 times per day

Over 100 pounds

Adult human dose

Ginger Tincture 

Dog’s Weight

Dosage

X Per Day

1 to 10 pounds 

1 to 3 Drops

2 to 3 times per day

10 to 20 pounds

3 to 5 Drops

2 to 3 times per day

20 to 50 pounds

5 to 10 Drops

2 to 3 times per day

50 to 100 pounds

20 Drops

2 to 3 times per day

Over 100 pounds

Adult human dose

NOTE: These are guidelines only

What Else Can Dogs Eat together with Ginger?

Ginger can be used in multiple ways, combined with many different foods or drinks. However, it is vital to limit the amount of ginger you use by following the guidelines.

You can be creative in the ways you use to get your dog to benefit from ginger. Some ideas are listed below.

  • Bake sugar-free, dog-friendly ginger snaps or gingerbread dog treats.
  • Make ginger water. Dogs cannot drink carbonated ginger ale, but you can mix a small pinch of powdered ginger into their water.
  • Alternatively, prepare your dog ginger tea or a pup-friendly smoothie.
  • Mix a minimal amount of grated raw ginger into your dog’s everyday food, wet or kibble. 

What are the Health Advantages of Feeding Ginger to Your Dog?

Ginger is loaded with nutrients and minerals and can help treat common health concerns in dogs, including bloat, heartworm disease, and arthritis. The health advantages of ginger are listed below.

1. Nausea 

Your Brussels Griffon, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, or another dog breed could feel nauseous because of something it ate. It could be a cancer treatment or motion sickness causing nausea and vomiting. If your dog gets car sick, give him ginger about 30 minutes before getting in the car. Ginger reduces nausea and acts as an anti-inflammatory by soothing the digestive tract to reduce nausea. 

Give your dog some ginger when you notice signs of nausea.

  • Panting 
  • Excessive drool
  • Loss of appetite
  • Drinking less water 
  • Lip licking or smacking
  • Odd facial expressions

Your dog may also eat grass when his stomach’s upset but there should be other signs as well. 

2. Bloat 

Bloat is when your dog’s stomach expands from built-up air, food, and fluid. Pressure builds up and expands your dog’s stomach. Bloat often progresses to gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), which is life-threatening. So if you think your dog is bloating, you need to get to the vet urgently. 

If the stomach twists, blood circulation becomes compromised. Organs won’t get the blood and oxygen they need to function and your dog will go into shock. Dogs can die from bloat or GDV in a matter of hours.

If your dog has bloat, you may see the symptoms listed below

  • Enlarged abdomen 
  • Excessive drooling 
  • Restlessness 
  • Abdominal pain 
  • Retching
  • Pale gums

As it worsens, you’ll begin to see …

  • Increased heart rate
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weakness
  • Collapse 

An exact cause hasn’t been scientifically confirmed for GDV. But there are plenty of risk factors including poor diet and genetics. 

Ginger may help at the early stages of bloat because it stimulates movement in the stomach. It can help move the contents of the stomach out quicker and prevent build-ups.

3. Flatulence 

Sometimes, your dog has to pass gas, as stinky as it may be. Gas builds up in your dog’s digestive system for two primary reasons. 

He swallows air while eating and drinking.

When food breaks down cruciferous vegetables (of the cabbage family), it releases gasses that have to come out. If it doesn’t, your English Bulldog or Mastiff will feel uncomfortable, and it could even cause bloat. Ginger is a carminative herb, which means it can help prevent and expel gas from your dog’s digestive tract.

You know your dog best, and as soon as he is more gassy than usual and ginger doesn’t help, a trip to the vet could be crucial.

4. Arthritis

Arthritis is an inflammatory disease. And ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory. Thus, adding ginger to your dog’s diet could help ease arthritis symptoms. 

There aren’t any studies that look at the effect of ginger on joint pain in dogs. But human and animal studies do show promise. One study showed ginger could reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee. In another study with rats, ginger helped reduce inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

5. Cancer

Ginger has even shown benefits as a cancer fighter in some studies. One study showed that ginger could slow the rate of breast cancer growth in mice. Another study demonstrated that ginger could kill lymphosarcoma cells in a test tube. It also had a positive effect on rats with liver cancer.

And since inflammation plays a role in cancer development, ginger can help prevent cancer. That’s because it’s an anti-inflammatory and an immune booster. Ginger can also help ease the side effects of cancer treatment because it can ease nausea. 

A common chemo drug used for dogs is cisplatin, which causes nausea and vomiting. A study showed that ginger reduced vomiting in dogs on this drug. 

6. Heartworm

Heartworm is a scary disease that can lead to the conditions listed below.

  • Lung disease
  • Heart failure 
  • Organ damage 
  • Death 

But when it comes to prevention, conventional options are a risky choice. They’re full of neurotoxic chemicals that can harm your dog. And conventional treatments are also risky and hard on your dog. The preventatives don’t stop your dog from getting infected, and it just kills the larvae before they become adult worms. 

The good news is that ginger is a more holistic approach to dealing with heartworm. 

What are the disadvantages of feeding Pasta to your dog?

While the effects of ginger are mainly positive for dogs, there are also some possible risks. Consider the risks below before you give your poodle, Golden Retriever, or any other breed ginger to ease a health condition. 

  • Blood-thinning

Although ginger can lower blood pressure, it also thins the blood. Do not feed them ginger if your dog is pregnant, has diabetes or heart disease, or is preparing for surgery. Also, dogs with bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia or von Willebrand’s disease should not receive ginger. Additionally, if your dog takes medication of any kind, consult with your veterinarian about how ginger may interfere.

  • Upset stomach

Though ginger can soothe your dog’s stomach, its hot, spicy taste can upset their digestive system or cause heartburn when they consume it. 

If you incorporate ginger into your dog’s diet, start by feeding them a minimal amount. Monitor your canine companion for any side effects (like drooling, fatigue, or vomiting) that could indicate an allergic reaction.

How can your Senior Dog Benefit from Ginger?

Like older people, aging dogs tend to have more ailments and health problems as they enter their golden years. Fortunately, there are many uses of ginger available to help your aging canine companion. 

Remember to consult your veterinarian anytime you start administering home remedies, especially if your dog does not react well to the treatment. Whether you believe in holistic medication for your Chihuahua or Dachshund, ginger is a low-cost, low-risk treatment for several ailments.

Almost all medicinal substitutes for ginger have some side effect or risk associated with their use. In contrast, ginger is relatively safe yet still effective for treating your older dog’s health issues. Ginger brings many benefits to the table where older dogs are concerned. Ginger comes in several different forms to make dosing and supplementing simple: dry powders, teas, capsules or tablets, and tinctures (liquid form).

Remember to consult your veterinarian anytime you start administering home remedies, especially if your dog does not react well to the treatment. Whether you believe in holistic treatment for your dog or not, ginger is a low-cost, low-risk treatment for several ailments. Almost all medicinal substitutes for ginger have some side effect or risk associated with their use. In contrast, ginger is relatively safe yet still effective for treating your older dog’s health issues.

Stomach Pain and Nausea

When dogs get older, their digestive system simply does not work as it used to when they were younger. 

  • Aging dogs can experience stomach problems for several reasons, often without a proper diagnosis. 
  • The slightest inconsistency can cause bloat, constipation, diarrhea, or even vomiting. 
  • Constipation is the most common stomach issue that older dogs deal with.

Ginger is excellent for this because it promotes healthy movement of the bowels.

For stomach ailments, you could also use the essential oil form of ginger, and it is not to be ingested in this form. Instead, place 1 to 2 drops on your dog’s paw or stomach when sickness occurs, and inhalation of the ginger’s aroma will do the necessary magic.

Immune Support

Ginger has anti-viral, anti-toxic, and anti-fungal properties. Older dogs have weaker immune systems, from tiny Pappilons to regal Afghan Hounds, making them more susceptible to bugs and viruses.

  • Ginger can strengthen a weakened immune system.
  • This herb also promotes blood circulation and flushes out toxins
  • Ginger helps to level out low blood pressure, all common health conditions in older dogs.

As an owner of an aging dog, you should also consider keeping your pet up to date on all of their vaccinations to ward off unwanted diseases.

What are the Best Ginger Dog Foods Recipes?

You can be creative when working a bit of ginger goodness into your go-to dog treat recipes.

Add ½ teaspoon grated fresh ginger, ½ cup finely diced apple, and ⅔ cup plain Greek yogurt into your basic doggy cookie recipe.

Mix 1 cup plain Greek yogurt, 1 finely diced apple, and ½ teaspoon finely grated ginger, and freeze the mixture in ice trays for healthy treats.

Add ½ teaspoon grated fresh ginger to a cup of hot water and let it seep until it has cooled down. Remove the ginger bits and let your furry friend sip some as-is or stir some into its food. Another option is using the ginger tea to make ice lollies or adding some of the ginger tea to a yogurt popsicle recipe.

Use your imagination if your Pembroke Welsch Corgi or Chinese Crested queen is picky. Add minimal amounts of ginger into the treats you already know they enjoy.

What are the best dog foods with Ginger?

Ginger is generally considered safe for most dogs and can benefit them in many ways. However, it’s always wise to talk to your veterinarian before you start including it in their diet. If you are not into preparing food and treats for your canine companions, you could use commercially packed food and treats. Below are some of the best ginger-containing toppers and kibble.

This puree provides your dog with the healthy fibrous benefits of pumpkin, combined with the soothing, natural anti-inflammatory properties of ginger and turmeric.

This grain-free, wet dog food topper is specially formulated for small-breed puppies. It features a simple blend of non-GMO pumpkin puree and supplemental ginger to help soothe your sidekick’s sensitive stomach. 

Specially formulated to meet the needs of adult dogs and puppies with digestive problems. The inclusion of ginger in this formula helps ease flatulence and indigestion.

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Sarah Brady

Sarah Brady is an animal lover and the proud dog-mom of a Golden Retriever named Brody and an Italian Greyhound named Jessup. Unfortunately, Jessup developed serious allergies to many different types of dog foods and ingredients when she was just a puppy. Meanwhile, Brody could eat seemingly anything and carry on as healthy as could be. Sarah spent hours of time researching and testing different foods and brands before finding something that worked for little Jessup. She wants Dog Food Care to simplify this experience for future dog-parents who face food allergy or tolerance issues of their own.